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Can recovering addicts make a difference?


sdm
sanjose
Can recovering addicts make a difference?
At our County Board of Supervisor’s meeting last week the issue of allocating $120,000 Methamphetamine Interdiction Funds was one of the items on the agenda.

The discussion went back and forth on whether to use the funds for prevention, treatment or a combination of both.

The prevention advocates wanted to send all the money to the Arizona Project which is based on the Montana Project and uses advertisements in the media to educate and scare citizens about the dangers of meth. The money would be sent out of our county and into Phoenix to be used statewide.

Those treatment advocates wanted to have the money kept at the local level to be allocated to local organizations that are involved in treatment and prevention.

The treatment/prevention advocates wanted to send some of the funds to Phoenix and leave some at the local level.

When all the dust settled the prevention advocates won on a 3-2 vote and ALL the funds will be sent out of the county and into the Arizona group in Phoenix. One of the arguments that the prevention group used was that the local treatment facilities did not send in a detailed plan on how they were going to use the money.

Last year the sheriff of the county made a statement about meth that got front-page coverage. He basically said that all efforts should be put into prevention because there is almost no success in treatment. The local people involved in meth treatment made the front page a few days later when they presented a lot of long-term addicts that are in recovery. These recovering addicts allowed their picture on the front page and told their story, which contradicted the Sheriffs position. Many of those recovering addicts were from the local NA organization.

The Sheriff is now the one that made the case to the Board of Supervisors to keep the $120,000 in our county and allocate the funds to the local treatment facilities. I do believe that the front-page articles by the local recovering addicts turned the sheriff around. Furthermore, I believe that had the recovering addicts and the officials made the presentation to the County Board of Supervisors regarding the $120,000 that money would have been left in this county to be used for treatment and prevention.

My point is that I want you recovering addicts to know that your stories can make a difference in your community. Our recovering addicts have changed our sheriff to where he is now an advocate for treatment. Furthermore, the recovering addicts have turned a prosecuting lawyer who bragged about how many addicts he put into prison into the highest judge in the county, the presiding judge of Superior Court . This same judge is the one that is administering and promoting the Drug Court program.

I believe that recovering addicts can make a difference. The task is to be informed and be informed in time, get involved and present your life to show the uneducated authorities that addiction does not mean automatic losers for life. Good people will respond to helping addicts with their disease if they are shown the facts and are touched by your stories of the miracle of recovery.

Do you think that recovering addicts can make a difference in your community?
     Replies...
Naiev
Newly
wed
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
I think they do. I think it also helps them in their own recovery.

I know someone that as part of his recovery, and to help others, speaks at schools, treatment facilities, and answers the NA hotline on Sundays from 7a - 7p.

He has 7 months clean.

Recovering addicts can relate. And how many tweakers read the newspaper?

Yes, they help others and keep themselves on the right track.
forget
suzette
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Yeah, we make a difference.
.............make room for the bad guy!   with out us there would be no definition for "strait"
LOL!
"if you think you're too small to make a difference,..........you never been in bed with a mosquito"
vctry7 Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Yes, they can. They can be used in prevention methods to teach others about the drug. Kids especially will pay more attention to someone who has been there, rather than just another cop or teacher trying to tell them something.

They can also be an example for other addicts that want to get clean.
They can also show society that recovery is possible and there is hope.
Penel0pe Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
Do you think that recovering addicts can make a difference in your community?
I'm on the Public Relations Committee for NA in my area and we are EVERYWHERE. We do presentations for the schools. We have a Children's Fair every year, and all the different county agencies have a booth. This year, the theme of the fair was a giant Monopoly Game - each agency had information and a question for the kids to answer - if they got it right, they got that "Property" (Park Place, etc.)

At our booth, if they got the answer WRONG, they got OUR card ... we were the "Go Directly to Jail" booth.. LOL ... a correct answer got them a "Get out of Jail free" card. Our question was "Is alcohol a drug?"

We do presentations for the courts, probation, mental health, the local inpatient treatment facility, CPS, and we even do an "Infomercial" for the local access channel.

I am going to the treatment center on Christmas day to do a panel.

My job on the PR committee is... Web servant. Go figure.

We feel that if we can reach ONE addict, then we've done a good job!
luve
piphany
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
AWESOME POST STAN!!!!!!!! Thank you Stan for supporting and encouraging the recovering addicts here and in the world! I'm sure you must have been wanting to jump out of your britches while debating this spending issue. I commend you and commend and commend you. I know the pain you and your wife live with and it takes a huge amount of integrity and compassion to deal in politics with such a personal and emotional issue. You have once again been an example to all. Thanks to the wife too.
danimal
55
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
^Ditto luve^... every word of THAT!
We KNOW we've made a difference Stan, addicts and loved ones alike, a difference that far exceeds our highest hopes!
We "can"...and we DO.
That IS what keeps us coming back. 
nine
years
clean
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
Do you think that recovering addicts can make a difference in your community?

I believe that the concept of addict helping addict is invaluable. I know that it was for me. Had I found a program other than NA that offered help and advice from those who had not been where I was, it wouldn't have made half the impression upon me and my recovery as did the fellowship I found in NA.

I NEEDED to know there were people just like me, who had been to depths of despair with meth that I had, and who had made it out.

I want to write more, but I can't. I'm buried at work for the next couple of days.

Stan: I've printed your post so I can savor it later.

sdm
sanjose
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Newlywed, Suz, Vctry, Pen, Luve, Dan, Lori-per and all the rest of the KCI gang.

You guys are the people I want when I am in a fox hole and surrounded by the enemy.

IMO, the recovering addicts and the loved ones of addicts are the best people to make a difference in their community. Why? Because they have a BURNING PASSION to help the addicts. They are not motivated by politics, prestige, money or any other crap like that.

Now let me tell you why I am pissed off!

I talked to the County Supervisor last night that was the main supervisor that was pushing to keep the funds here locally. She wanted to give the money to the local prevention and treatment facilities.

I asked her why the others voted against her. She said that the main supervisor (Russell) that was pushing to give the money to the state non-profit organization had a motive. That motive was that the chairman of that non-profit organization is a big shot Arizona politician and will help Russell advance his political career beyond the local level.

Furthermore, she told me that Russell’s statement that the local treatment entities can come back at budget time to request money from the “Contingent funds” was a deterrent. She said that they have never used the “Contingent Funds” for anything other than for their county departments and never for any outside agencies. I thanked her for standing up for us and told her that I would be telling people about this incident now and especially at election time. Most of the supervisors are men but she was the only one with BALLS!!

The motive for personal political advancement took precedence over the health and life of people that are sick (addicts). I know I should not be surprised because we all know that politics can be very ugly. It is just when you see it right in front of your grill it gets to you a little.

Now if I had you guys on the county board of supervisors, I know our community would have the funds allocated to the areas that would help the most regardless of the personal gain. That is what I meant by BURNING PASSION to help the addicts.

Ok, I have now let off enough steam so that I can try to get into the Christmas spirit. However, I am not going to forget Russell’s motive. Also I am going to give our lady supervisor with balls as much support as I can.

My final thought;
what good is power without unselfish compassion?


My Hero told a story about a person that was hurt and needed help. A prestigious social elite man saw the hurt person and walked on the other side. Another person, a person that was socially unacceptable to most of the prestigious elite, saw the hurt man. He stopped gave the man assistance, took him to the hospital and paid for his care. He told the hospital if there are any other expenses I will pay for them also.

My Hero was teaching about unselfish compassion

That is what I see in most of you guys on this board, unselfish compassion for the addicts and loved ones of the addicts. 
djmom
11
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Yes, yes yes recovering addicts can make a difference.

I think it is totally ridiculous for a county board of supervisors to send money out of the county for a problem that needs to be taken care of in that county. I think the way to go is treatment mostly, with maybe a small portion to prevention - cause prevention doesn't really seem to do that much good. But any way you spend the money it should have been spent in that county helping the people of that county. UGH!!! just irritates me - politics!
Penel0pe Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
I asked her why the others voted against her. She said that the main supervisor (Russell) that was pushing to give the money to the state non-profit organization had a motive.

Here's the good news:
AA, NA, CMA... we don't ACCEPT outside donations.

So, if you want panels from these 12 step programs to go into your schools, your probation departments, courts, drug and alcohol programs, ANYWHERE - call the local numbers (You can find us in the white pages) and ask the person who answers the hotline for the "PR Chair" (For NA) or for H&I or PI Chairperson's numbers, and they will direct you to the appropriate person... and you can get a panel WITHOUT any money.

The 7th tradition of 12 step programs states that we don't accept any outside contributions... so our services to the community are FREE.

Take that to the council!

sdm
sanjose
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?

Quote:


Pen’s quote
AA, NA, CMA... we don't ACCEPT outside donations.
Ya know Pen maybe that is a blessing. The twelve-steppers are very successful WITHOUT political donations. Perhaps the political donations have such huge strings tied to them that it gets in the way of progress. Come to think of it, it is interesting when you realize that the twelve-steppers are the most successful recovery program in the world and they take NO Political contributions. The other thing that I noticed is that the twelve-steppers have the RIGHT MOTIVE; they are not looking for personal political advancement.

I still don’t like the idea that our supervisors sent our money out of our county for a prevention only program. I would much rather the money been given to the local prevention AND treatment programs.

The program the money went to is called Arizona Meth Project and is based on the Montana Meth Project. It may be a good program, I just don’t know much about the Montana Meth Program. Does anyone know about the Montana Meth Project?

I wish that our local political councils were as affective as the twelve-steppers; we would have a lot more recoveries!!!
vctry7 Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Stan,
Here is the link for the Montana Meth Program's ads.
www.montanameth.org/ads_television.aspx

And here is the link for the teenager's site.
www.notevenonce.com
I especially liked the statewide art contest.

I know that it was a very expensive project. I read that it started when a wealthy man from Canada heard about the meth problem in Montana from a friend. He spent millions of his own dollars getting it started. I'll look for the link to that story.

I also know that a few states, Utah included, want to copy the project. However, some people think it is too graphic.

If you write them they will send you a DVD with more information about the project and a few of their commercials. You have to have QuickTime on your computer to view all the TV ads from the internet.
vctry7 Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
www.billingsgazette.com/n...-fight.inc
He donated 5.6 million of his own money. He is a part-time resident of Montana.
sdm
sanjose
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
VICTRY7, thank you for those links.

First I want to say that my hat is off for Mr. Siebel!
His 5.6 million out of his own pocket is HUGE.
Quote:
Billingsgazette quote
“The money is being used to help pay for radio and television commercials, along with newspaper ads and billboards targeting teenagers, about the dangers of meth use.
"They're disturbing. It's a disturbing subject," Siebel said of the advertisements. He added that he knows some people will be upset by the content, but he believes revealing the toll meth addiction takes is the only way to make a difference.”

I don’t think the use of advertisements (prevention) is the ONLY way to make a difference but I am still grateful that people like Mr. Siebel is taking an active part in the war on Meth. Perhaps Mr. Siebel’s generous contribution will start a chain reaction and some of the other influential people of Canada and USA will join the fight

Quote:
Billingsgazette quote
“Siebel said the Montana Meth Project includes surveys to follow up on the advertisements' impact. Based on those results, project coordinators will revise and refine the campaign”

I did a search on the Internet to see if I could find any hard data on the effectiveness of the Montana Meth Project. I found two press releases from the Missoula, Montana media and one said the project is producing results and the other said that there have been no positive results so far.
What about you people on this board; do you think that disturbing advertisements about the dangers of Meth in the media will have a huge effect, little effect, or no effect at all?

Sfj Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Here's what I think.
Compare it to the trend in smoking cigs.

In CA, very few people smoke anymore.
It just isn't seen as glamorous, or sexy.
It is seen as something disgusting, gross, and ugly.

When meth use is seen the same way, meth use will diminish.

I think it was in the early 1960's that the original Surgeon General's report on nicotine addiction was released.  About forty years later, progress is being made.

There are many other aspects, but this one is often ignored IMHO.
Penel0pe Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
Perhaps the political donations have such huge strings tied to them that it gets in the way of progress.
We have ONE purpose - to carry the message to the addict who still suffers. We don't affiliate with any outside enterprises, but are more than happy to carry the message to anyone who wants to hear it.
sdm
sanjose
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
SFJ quote
Compare it to the trend in smoking cigs.
In CA, very few people smoke anymore.

It just isn't seen as glamorous, or sexy.
It is seen as something disgusting, gross, and ugly.
When meth use is seen the same way, meth use will diminish.
Good logic SFJ!
One of the things I like about this board is that meth use is presented as NOT glamorous or sexy but as something disgusting, gross, and ugly. The recovering addicts do a great job of proving this to be true by their telling the TRUTH about their own life with meth.

Additionally, the loved ones of meth users reveal the deep pain and damage that occurs within the relationship with a user.

I think that when you compare nicotine (cigs) with meth in the perception area, the anti-meth campaign does not have to battle the billions of dollars that was spent by the tobacco industry to make cigs look glamorous and sexy. Remember the tough good-looking Marlboro man and the sexy Virginia slim lady? I don’t know of any meth campaigns that present meth use as glamorous and sexy.

Because the anti-meth campaigns do not have to battle billions of dollars presenting meth as glamorous and sexy, hopefully the anti-meth campaigns will not take 40 years to start having an affect.

Maybe the Montana Meth Project and now the Arizona Meth Project will give us some information in the near future to see if presenting meth as disgusting, gross and ugly will diminish meth use.

In addition to presenting meth use as disgusting, gross and ugly, the Montana Meth Project uses scare tactics. Scare tactics worked on me regarding heroine and LSD.

Do you think that scare tactics work as a good deterrent for most people?
Sfj Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
I don't know about most people perhaps, but I know about some people.

I've posted the following many times on this forum.
"In schools, some people see the drug presentations and they are scared to death, the kid sitting next to him sees the same thing and can't wait to try it."

When I saw LSD publicized, I couldn't wait to try it.
There is a world of difference between LSD and heroin though.
Frankly, I can't think of any two drugs that are further apart.
Speed however is unique - without a doubt.
sdm
sanjose
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
Quote:
SFJ quote
When I saw LSD publicized, I couldn't wait to try it.
There is a world of difference between LSD and heroin though.
Frankly, I can't think of any two drugs that are further apart.
Speed however is unique - without a doubt.
SFJ, you could not wait to try LSD; why did you NOT want to try heroin?
In my case I was really scarred of LSD and heroin but not marijuana, and amphetamines.
I thought that I would lose control of reality with LSD and jump out a window and try to fly. With heroin I was sure that it would kill me quickly. I know that may sound silly but FEAR sure did the trick for me and I am a semi-risk taker.

SFJ, in what way is speed unique?

IMO, if fear can keep 10% or more of people from trying certain drugs (meth) then it is a viable method in the war on Meth. Maybe the Montana Meth Project (MMP) is going to make a real difference in prevention. I noticed that the MMP uses recovering addicts to get the message out.
Bent
But
Not
Broken1
Re: Can recovering addicts make a difference?
In my opinion, I feared every drug I had seen causing damage from education in high school and in college. Keep in mind that what little I did see about meth was based on how it was used in the services (wars) and weight loss-that was the sum total of it.

Through my CEU's, I'm advocating for *real* education for those in high school, community college, and college now. That's one difference I can make as a former user I'm pretty sure I can get implemented here.

I'm going to go to the Montana Meth site and see if I can't get info. mailed to me to use with our local government now. As the website presents meth-I would have NEVER thought once about trying it. Yes, it scared me. I hope and pray it continues working in Montana and does work in AZ and starts branching out to other states also.

That takes former addicts using their collective voices though. So yes, we can make a difference.

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